Black millet ugali with meat

Making black millet ugali in Khabakaya Primary school and Rise&Shine special school.

In Kenya, ugali is the name for the most common mealtime starch: a thick, stiff porridge made from white cornmeal or red millet.

Ugali is a very simple dish of milled white maize, cooked with water until it’s very stiff and pulls away from the side of the pan. It’s served in big floppy slabs together with meat and vegetables.

Traditionally, ugali was made with millet – a rich and nutritious grain. But when cornmeal, or maize, found its way to the African continent, it became even more popular as a grain staple.

Millet is a gluten-free grain that is nutrient dense and fibre-rich. It is linked to good heart health, diabetes management, gallstone prevention, in fact, it ranked as one of the world’s healthiest food.

The traditional way to eat ugali is to gather it up in small, thumb-sized balls, pressing it together with the tips of your fingers. Then you make a small indentation on one side and use it to scoop up meat, vegetables, or stews. It’s a substitute for any sort of cutlery at traditional Kenyan tables.

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Gladys making black millet ugali in Rise&Shine special school
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Serving the food in Rise&Shine special school
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Sophia in the kitchen of Khabakaya Primary school
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Almost ready to eat
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Hygiene is essential! Washing hands before eating in Khabakaya Primary school

Ingredients for black millet ugali:

1)dried cassava

2) some sorghum

3) black millet

4) roasted meat (red meat)

5) omufume (dried special grass)

6) little bit fresh milk

7) enough salt

Recipe: Bring to boil some water and salt. Add flour to your liking and then spin over very low heat. Cook for about 40 minutes.

Materials:

https://healthylivingkenya.wordpress.com/2014/02/13/how-and-why-to-eat-more-brown-ugali/

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=53

http://www.thekitchn.com/word-of-mouth-ugali-76209

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Tartu Hiie School and Rise and Shine School Exchange Drawings

Tartu Hiie School have good friends from Kenya from Rise and Shine School. We study about each others countries, nature, traditions, schoollife. We write and draw about these themes and change packets. Packets reach to us 2-3 times in year, because we can change these with help of volunteers. We are thankful that volunteers share with us their first-hand impressions and memories and show many nice videos and pictures about our friends.

This time we exchanged food pictures, below you can see a gallery of our drawings. Fruits and Easter drawings are from Hiie School, all others are from the students of Rise and Shine School in Kenya.

Kenyan foods by Rise and Shine Special School

Together with Rise and Shine special school we prepared Omushenye with sour milk. Omushenye is a Kiluhya (tribe in Kenya) well liked sweet meal witch is prepared for supper. It makes one satisfied and contains nutrients for body growth and development. It contains carbohydrates, proteines, minerals. Omushenye comprises of beans and sweet potatoes. They are cooked differently by boiling and later mashed together till they are mixed evenly to be one. It’s left to cool then served as main meal with sour milk or any drink one can prefear for. It boasts body growth due to the extra suppliments in them.

Mashed bananas are prepared by peeling the outer cover, washed, then boiled, mashed, left to cool, then served with omufuluko (marshed groundnuts which have been roasted)

Ugali and local vegetable (murere) is mostly to the old aged people. It’s very nutritious and easy to prepare. Murere is a local green vegetable which grows even without planting. It needs lett attention and can survive in any weather condition. Preparing murere is easy. It’s boiled with local burnt ash from bean leaves, it becomes ready after some minutes and served after cooling with ugali or mashed bananas.

Sour milk is a luhya drink liked by most of the people. It’s a drink drunk by any age-group, because it contains nutritive forming microorganisms which builds up and boost body growth. During its preparation fresh milk is put in guard (Eshimuka) and left to stay there for some three to five days. The guard is shaken smoothly on the thighs to make the milk to taste sweet and smooth to the tongue. One can drink without adding sugar or add depending on one’s taste and choice. Sour milk can be drunk with potatoes, ugali, bananas, yams (nduma) or drunk without any solid food. Taste sour milk and can not miss to have it for meal as it contains proteins, vitamins and calcium in it.

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