Estonian School lunch at Kongo Primary School

The primary school class 5 students from Miina Härma Gümnaasium draw pictures of their school lunch and sent them with two Estonian ladies to Kongo, Ghana for a display at Kongo Primary School.Kongo PS_MHG (1).jpg

The Mondo teacher John Bire organised the exhibition on 15th of December 2015. But first the pupils had to discover from the pictures the items of food that are common for both Estonian and Ghanaian students like chicken, tomatoes, cucumber, bread and carrots. But there was also a lot to discover for Kongo students: beloved fruits like cherries were even unknown for the teacher. Another aspect the pupils found bizarre was the fact that most Estonian students drink milk with their lunch.

Kongo Primary school is one of the lucky schools that benefits from the national school feeding programme. Not all schools and students have this luxury. When you take a look at the poster, notice also the section dedicated for hygiene in the lower left section and how all of the family is involved in the process: father is farming, mother is cooking and children are happily in school!

Kongo Prim Deco (5)

Take a look at the menu and go check what foods were banku and okro! Also compare the menu with yours at school and to the recommended food pyramid.

Kongo Prim Deco (3)

Estonian pupils are eager to receive replies to discover more in detail the Ghanaian food!

 

 

Northern Ghanaian most common dish TZ with vegetable soup

Zanlerigu Primary School

Ghanaian national food: TZ with vegetable soup
In Africa, especially Ghanaians consume varieties of food. One of the most cherished food consumed in the northern part of Ghana is “tuo zaafi” (TZ).

T.Z can be prepared using maize or millet. This millet is sub-divided into two: early millet called “nara” and guinea corn called “kemolega”.

After harvest this harvested millet is dried for 3-4 days and when well dried, you thrash or pound them and afterwards remove all the chaffs from the grains.

Also, the grains are ground using the grinding stone or grinding mill. This ground grains are called flour. This flour will be mixed with water. The water should stay for a day so that fermentation will take place. With your entire cooking utensils ready e.g. stirring rod, pot etc pour the fermented mixture inside the pot on fire and stir till it is uniformly mixed to form porridge. When this porridge is well boiled add flour and start stirring and adding the flour for 2-3 minutes and that makes what is called T.Z.

T.Z can be taken with a lot of soup depending on the kind of soup one prefers: groundnut paste and okro soup (vegetable soup) is what we intend eating with our T.Z.

With your groundnut paste, okro and other ingredients ready, you cut your okro into pieces set your fire and if the water starts boiling, pour your okro inside the pot.

If it starts to boil or boiling add salt bitter into it. In Ghana salt is very important in preparation of any meal, so you add salt and any other ingredients that are made available to you. You can even add meat if you have.

After all this you then serve your bowls and that makes a complete meal for consumption.

Bon appetit!

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Our food project coordinator
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Our chef
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Cutting okro
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Preparing T.Z.
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T.Z. with vegetable soup is ready

Spend the next 10 minutes with us  to see the video and find out how our most common dish is made.

 

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Read all the post by students from Ghana.

World Food Day in Dasabligo PS

It was World Food Day last Thursday, so to celebrate that Dasabligo Primary School prepared different dishes from maize. Our first post here was about harvesting maize and now we continued our project and cooked some traditional maize meals.

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Ghanaian national dishes we made on World Food Day

Uses of maize
Maize is sold in the fresh or dry shelled state in the local markets. The marketing of maize is done by many middlemen.

Maize is eaten by roasting and boiling at the fresh state.

Maize is locally used in making food such as “kenkey”, “waha”, “goya” (“tubani”), porridge, tuo zaafi (TZ), “mgmera”, rasta porridge, “banku” among others.

Both grain and leaves are used to feed farm animals. It is also used in making alcohol (“pito”), corn starch, corn oil, corn syrubs and sugars. The husks are used to wrap food (“kenkey”) and to wave doormats. The stalks are used as fuel (firewood) food cooking and mulching soils.

We prepared six different meals, as you can see from following photos:

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“Banku”
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Beans and maize
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Okrosoup with beef
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Pepper sauce
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Tomato-onion-fish sauce
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“Tubani”

How we prepared the dishes? Watch our video and find out!

http://youtu.be/9QWu4yyJQaU

Happy World Food Day!

Read all the posts by Dasabligo Primary School
Read all the post by students from Ghana.