World Food Week brought fresh ideas and tastes to Väike-Maarja

World Food Week in Väike-Maarja (in Lääne-Viru county) took place on 16th to 20th of November in 2015. The activities stroked senses and encouraged to think about food and its origin.

On 17th of November we had meetings, lectures and cooking classes with an inspiring guest, Mrs Liina Saaremäe, a representative of NGO Mondo. The subject of the day was “Food in Ghana and Ghanaian food”.

The day began with Liina’s meeting with our pupils in elementary scool (1st-4th classes). We learned that Liina is an Estonian school teacher, who was deployed by the NGO Mondo to the Republic of Ghana in West-Africa to do volunteer work. As an introduction, every child had to choose a candy: raisin in cocoa, almond in cocoa or hazelnut in cocoa. They were told about the cocoa and the fact that in Kalevi kommivabrik nearly 70% of cocoa comes from Ghana, a country which was the main topic of the day. Pupils learned about Ghanaian life, society and food. The best questioners were awarded a bookmark-rulers and teachers received different proverbs to discuss their significance in classes. The pupils were shown and given to sniff a kalebass – a bowl made of pumpkin, from which people in Ghana are eating.

 

Liina's lecture to the 5th-12th graders and students from vocational school
Liina’s lecture to the 5th-12th graders and students from vocational school

On the same day, we had a next meeting in Väike-Maarja with Liina and our older students from 5th-12th classes and vocational school. At first, Liina opened the meaning of volunteering. Her volunteer work in Ghana took place in 2014. As we learned, her responsibility was to develop cooperation, global education and humanitarian assistance. Her specific tasks in Ghana were teachers methodical training and food projects, plus additional lessons to teach children to read and write. With numerous images and stories she shared her moments in Ghana – so called ice cream (or frozen juice in a plastic bag), Ghanaian national dishes, custom to carry things on your head, we all learned the Ghanaian hello “toma-toma” and the Ghanaian approving rhythmic clap. It was eyes-opening and interesting to learn that food and eating is of vital importance in Ghana, and a private activity – even so private, that the dinner guest is left alone to eat in the hut. Our students were directed to think about the one billion people in the world who live below the poverty line.

IMG_5642As in Väike-Maarja we also have a vocational school, Liina held a cooking course for vocational students and their supervisors. Together they prepared a Ghanaian dish called „red-red“ that was served with fried bananas. The participants all agreed – the result was delicious. Liina had only positive words about the active cookers, who were even ready to take a next cooking lesson by the end of the class.

 

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Degustation of different countries breads

During the week our pupils had a possibility to taste various countries breads, participate in photo competition of world food and recipes. Food provided by the school canteen was also by the week theme, from different regions of the world – Ukrainian, Italian, Chinese, the Mediterranean, Estonian. Primary school added a playful nuance – a guessing game about the region of the food for the children.  Different nationalities from the Vao refugee center nearby came to school to introduce, share recipes and offer their snacks – Ukrainian pancakes with cottage cheese, biscuits from Afghanistan and Dagestan.

 

There’s no doubt, World Food Week brought new tastes and ideas to Väike-Maarja. We are grateful to all the people, who contributed to the success of the World Food Week, especially to you, dear Liina, and NGO Mondo!

 

Heili Nõgene

Public Relations Specialist

Väike-Maarja Gymnasium

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Ghanaian food in Peetri School

This event took place as a part of world month named “World’s Different Faces”, read more here:

https://maailmahariduspeetris.wordpress.com/maailmapaevad-2015/

Few weeks ago, when it was our cooking class, we got to meet a volunteer from Ghana. At the beginning she introduced us Ghana’s traditions and different foods and then she introduced us what we were going to cook. So the meal was made of fried bananas and some spicy sauce called „red-red“. It was a bit surprising that African people don’t eat bananas as a dessert. Bananas are considered as a salty food or a dish.

When it was time to start cooking, we were told what to do and then we started. At first, some of us fried the raw bananas and the others were making the sauce. Our food was smelling so good that some teachers even came and peeked into our kitchen to see what we were doing. Besides cooking African food, we got to hear different stories about volunteering life in Africa. Finally it was time to eat our delicious meal and we were positively surprised about the good taste of fried bananas with „red-red“ sauce. We are thankful for that fun experience.

Peetri kooli toidupäev

Kama – a traditional estonian food

Eshiakulo Secondary School pupils had an opportunity to taste traditional estonian food – kama. What is kama? Kama is a traditional Estonian finely milled flour mixture. The kama is a mixture of roasted barley, rye, oat and pea flour. The oat flour can be completely replaced by wheat flour.

Historically kama was a non-perishable, easy to carry food that could be quickly fashioned into a stomach-filling snack by rolling it into butter. Kama didn’t require baking, as it was already roasted.

“Kama flour” is healthy and natural product made of Estonian crops. A meal from kama flour will provide you with a healthier diet option. Kama flour is a product rich in fibres and minerals and a valuable source of B group vitamins. Use kama flour with fermented milk products, it will double the healthy impact.

Nowadays kama is used for making some desserts. It is mostly enjoyed for breakfast mixed with milk, buttermilk or kefir as mush. It is frequently sweetened with sugar and berries.

Traditional Estonian dishes are conspicuous for the simplicity of their preparation. Just take kama, mix it with milk or buttermilk and eat it! Simple as that!

Making kama is easy
Not bad at all. Strange, but eatable.
A little taste of Estonia
Just mix it and eat it!
Kama with strawberries

 

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Ghanaian food in Estonian school

Hello, dear food blog reader!

This is Mondo volunteer Liina here again!

On Thursady, 12th of March I organised in Kunda School (North-Estonia) a Ghanaian event. We talked about Ghana, I shared my experience as a volunteer, showed pictures and videos. We also tasted original shea butter we made in Ghana with the students of Sekoti Primary School….and we prepared one Ghanain dish  ourselves! There were approximately 80 students involved in this project.

The dish, actually the drink we made was “ZOOMKOOM” – “flour water”.

Before preparing the drink, we watched the video, made in Kongo village, and learned how to do it!

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Watching a video about “Zoomkoom”

 

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The students of Kunda School preparing “Zoomkoom”
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Tasting “Zoomkoom”
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Liina and the students of Kunda School: chilli is an important ingredient
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Older students preparing “Zoomkoom”
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“Zoomkoom” has an interesting taste: sweet and spicy at the same time!

 

 

 

Estonian Independence Day – national dishes in Toila Gymnasium

We are students from Toila Gymnasium and currently we are in 11th grade. In honour of 97th Estonian Independence Day (24th February) we decided to make three different national dishes. Cooking these dishes is easy and fast. We hope that you try them out and find them delicious.

Enjoy your dishes! 

 

Toila Gümnaasium
Estonia – a small country with a beautiful nature, unique ethnic patterns and friendly people. Estonian people always stick together no matter what happens and protect their homeland with passion. We can bring out friendship in our own country and also between other countries by sticking together.

 

Classic potato salad

            Ingredients:

  • 10-15 potatoes
  • 4 carrots
  • 5-6 eggs
  • 1 large cucumber
  • 4-5 pickles
  • 1 large onion
  • 400g-500g sausage
  • 400ml sour cream
  • 400ml mayonnaise
  • Salt, sugar, pepper, herbs etc

Snapshot 2 (3-3-2015 4-19 PM)

 

How to make?

  1. Boil the pealed potatoes and carrots until tender (about 15-20minutes). Drain well, cool slightly, then chop them into small pieces.
  2. Meanwhile, bring a seperate pot of water to a boil. Carefully add the eggs; cook for 10min. Peel the eggs under cold running water, then roughly chop.
  3. Put chopped potatoes, carrots and eggs into a bowl.
  4. Chop the cucumber, pickles and sausage into a small pieces. Add them to the same bowl.
  5. For a dressing take a different bowl. Mix sour cream and mayonnaise. Add salt, sugar, pepper, herbs and a chopped onion (to taste).
  6. Pour the dressing on the salad ingredients and mix them together.
  7. Serve immediately or let the salad sit for awhile to soak up the dressing.

 

Sprat sandwich

            Ingredients:

  1. Black bread
  2. Sprats
  3. Green onion
  4. Butter
  5. One boiled egg

kilu

How to make?

Spread the butter on the bread. Clean up the sprats. Put the cleaned sprats on the bread. Slice the egg and the onion and put it on top of the sprats. Your sandwich is ready to eat! 🙂

 

Cream of wheat/semolina

            Ingredients:

  1. 1 l mixed juice with water
  2. 1,5 ml semolina (cream of wheat)
  3. 0, 5-1 ml sugar

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How to make?

Mix the juice (200ml) with water (total should have a liter of liquid) if necessary add sugar. Heat the juice to boil then add semolina (cream wheat) and mix quickly. Boil on low heat about 15 minutes, until the semolina is thick. For making cream of wheat/samolina the porridge should not be too thick. Pour the mixture into a larger bowl, let cool down, and then whisk until it is fluffy and creamy. Serve it with or without a cold milk.

 

 

 

                                  

Omushenye, simsim and milk

Material: beans, sweet potatoes, milk, simsim (sesame seeds), firewood, salt and water

Prepare beans, wash them, put them in a clean sufuria (bowl), put enough water, then light fire and put on sufuria. Let it take 2 hours, then put in sweet potatoes, which have been chopped and washed properly. It will take 1 hour to be ready, then cook it the way you cook ugali almost 1 hour. Then it will be ready to eat. We call it Omushenye in our language.

Prepare simsim, wash them properly, put them in a clean sufuria and put it on fire to make them dry. After that put them in a container called Eshinu in our language and start mixing by using a heavy stick until it becomes soft like heavy porridge. Therefore take clean cups and put in milk. The food now is ready to eat. This food is carrying nutrients, energy and vitamins to make body healthy and strong. In our culture this food is prepared in special occations. During the time we cooked it at school, pupils and teachers were happy, because it is a respectful food.

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Luhya traditional food in Kenya

Omushenye:

Omushenye (a mixture of boiled beans and boiled sweet potatoes) is a luhya traditional food which is liked by most of the families because of being nutritious. In it, it comprises of proteins, carbohydrates vitamins and calcium that makes the body healty and strong. Proteins help the body by building up worn out cells and tissues. Carbohydrates help the body by adding energy that makes body strong. Vitamins protect the body against various diseases like rickets, scuvy, kwarshioko, marasmus.

How omushenye is prepared

Either dried or fresh beans are boiled/cooked to be soft to the chew. Fresh clean sweet potatoes are cut in pieces and added to the already boiling beans so as to boil together and from one mixture which will be mached to be called omushenye. Salt is added at the earlier stage before the end of the boiling. It can be left to cool then served with fish, meat, chicken stew.

Omunyobo:

Omunyobo (fine mashed roasted monkey nuts) is a luhya traditional food that is favoured by many people for it is noutritious and boosts body growth and development. Protenous content is high which helps in repairing the worn out cells and tissues. Omunyobo also contains calcium that builds up bone formation and development and also helps gums and teeth to be firm and strong enough. It contains fats that make the body skin to be moist, smooth to touch.

How to prepare Omunyobo

Omunyobo is prepared bu roasting dry monkey nuts. It is the mashed that it becomes fine and smooth to touch. The fat content in it makes omunyobo to be moist and fine. Omunyobo can be eaten with other solid foods like mashed bananas, sweet potatoes, yams, cassavas or irish potatoes, chips and chapatis.

Amabere amasatse:

Amabere amasatse (sour milk) contains microorganisms that protect the body against different diseases. The proteinous content in the milk builds up the body to be healthy.

How it is prepared

Fresh milk is kept in a guard for some days (can be 3-5 days) according to ones taste. The guard is shaken smoothly on the things to make up a heavy fine mixture. Other fresh milk can be added little by little depending on how one wants the level of sourness to be. One can drink with other solid food like sweet potatoes, cassavas, ugali, bananas, yams or chips. These food can be eaten as lunch or supper, for it is sweet and leaves one satisfied for long time.

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Making omushenye in Mungan’ga Secondary School

This is how we prepared food:

We had beans, sweet potatoes, mashed simsim (sesame seeds). We started to boil beans almost 1 hour, after that you put there sweet potatoes, then you mash together like ugali (maize meal in Kenya). After that you try simsim and mash. This is food in our language called Omushenye.

This food is carrying out nutrition and makes the body to be strong. This is the traditional food and also food for our visitors which is carrying carbohydrates and fats.

It is the best nutritional food in our culture in Africa.

Keenia kool

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Beans cakes with stew by Yakoti PS

Usually is Ghanaian national dish “tobani” (beans flour cakes) eaten with sheaoil and pepper but Yakoti Primary School wanted to prepare “tobani” with stew.

It is the same dish as “tubani” or “toubani”, different villages call it just differently.

There are some photos about our food project below.

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Our camera-man with Mondo donated tablet.
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Grass and leaves are used in preparing “tobani”
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Cooking place is ready
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Cakes are cooked by steaming
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“Tobani” is ready now, removing the leaves
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Cooks are presenting: stew and beans cakes
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Bon appetit! Head isu! Nayen song ka la sigi!

 

Video tells more than photos, so watch our video too!

 

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